In Malcolm Gladwell’s 2000 best seller, The Tipping Point, he identifies a concept called, The Law of the Few.

He states that widespread popularity is attained by a few key types of people who champion ideas, concepts, and products before they reach what he calls, the tipping point.

Gladwell describes these key types as Connectors, Mavens, and Salesmen.

If individuals representing all three of these groups endorse and advocate a new idea, it is much more likely that it will tip into widespread success.

Prior to this clarification, it was called good old-fashioned networking!

The book fascinated me and gave me a very clear understanding that the ability to “connect” was, indeed, a gift and one that I would continue to capitalize on.

If you are in business and haven’t read it, it’s a must, especially considering it was written prior to Facebook and LinkedIn, two of the most recognized platforms for connecting.

Most people only think about networking in terms of sales and I say bulls_ _t!.

Whatever it is you want in life, it will produce the results you desire IF you have a strong enough network.

Consider things like the time you wanted to get your kid into a certain school or you wanted tickets to that special concert or reservations at that new restaurant, it really is who you know that will produce the results.

When it comes to business, the results should be fairly obvious.

We have become well known for our abilities in this area and have been fortunate to work directly with many other organizations helping them develop their on and off-line networking skills.

This past week, my passion for networking was recognized in Inc. Magazine:

http://www.inc.com/young-entrepreneur-council/best-advice-i-ever-got-spend-time-in-other-people-s-shoes.html

For those that are interested in developing their networking abilities,

I give you my Top Ten Networking Skills:

Be Prepared.

Arrive Early.

Have a Plan.

Be a Giver and/or a Connector.

Leave Your Troubles Behind.

Listen With Focus.

Be Genuine.

Do Teach/Don’t Sell.

Follow Up.

Follow Up Some More!

And that’s what Nudelberg says!